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20121027
20121104
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3 (some duplicates have been removed)
. but there is dna-like technology that can catch a medal thief red-handed. cbs 5 reporter elizabeth cook shows us how it works and asks the question, why isn't anyone using it here? >> reporter: brazen thieves crashed a truck through a fence to get to a spool of copper wire in this pg&e yard. >> we had almost 5.2 million in copper theft over the last six years. >> reporter: in vallejo, criminals strip wiring from the electrical grid. >> over the last 18 months, we've had over 97 different locations where thieves have taken the electrical cables that power our street lights. >> reporter: that's on top of 300 places where they've stolen brass components from the water system. and across the bay area, they take metal from cemeteries, storm drains and automobiles. it's a problem not foreign to europe either, where thieves have hit hard at infrastructure. but the germans and others have found the answer to a huge problem may be a tiny dot. >> we call it the least expensive, most effective anti- theft device ever created. >> reporter: an australian- based company paints microdots on metal. you magnify
-mail, the intersection of technology and privacy was paid long ago. back when the internet was known as the information superhighway. but now it seems the road is wide open, and wherever it leads, you're not only being watched, you're being photographed. >> it was very obvious that there was something different about that police car. >> reporter: mike had heard about the san leandro police department's license plate scanner. then one day he saw for himself the specially equipped car and began to wonder. he asked for public records and photos. >> i requested not just information about the cars that have been photographed by the license plate scanner, i also requested details about how many records they had gathered since the system started being used. >> reporter: to mike's surprise, over the encounters of two years, police had taken about 120 pictures of him and his car. an average of one a week. one clearly shows where he is. at home. but to mike, all of them show disturbly personal information. >> in at least one of those pictures, you can very clearly identify me getting out of the car with my two d
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3 (some duplicates have been removed)